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OCT24

Using Telemedicine in Rural Alabama

In 2011, with the support of the AIDS United Access to Care Initiative, Medical AIDS Outreach (MAO) established the Alabama eHealth program to deliver high-quality care in underserved communities in rural portions of the state through telemedicine. Specifically targeting areas that serve as epicenters of HIV/AIDS incidence, MAO has leveraged telemedicine technology against rurality and poverty-driven barriers to accessing HIV care, ultimately empowering Alabama’s rural residents to access the quality care that they deserve in the communities where they live. I spoke with Dr. Laurie Dill, MAO’s medical director and chief medical officer, to learn more about MAO’s experience with telemedicine.

Posted By: Sarah Hashmall, Communications Manager - Tuesday, October 24, 2017


OCT04

Continuing Forward: Leadership For Now

I got a call in May 2016. “Jesse we are searching for the interim President & CEO of AIDS United…. Are you interested?” Without missing a heartbeat, I thought to myself, “You must do this – now!” My life changed immediately. I could never have predicted all the other changes coming in 2016. For all of us living with, working for, and affected by HIV in America, 2016 was a year of unexpected change.

Posted By: Jesse Milan, Jr, President & CEO, AIDS United - Wednesday, October 04, 2017


MAY01

My Voice Can Affect Change

I got to be a part of AIDSWatch through a scholarship provided by the Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation. This one event has changed my life in so many ways and has given me the confidence to speak out against the stigma that is placed upon people with HIV/AIDS and how budget cuts on programs that help fund housing, medicine, and education affect not only me, but others living with HIV/AIDS.

Posted By: LaWanda Wilkerson - Monday, May 01, 2017


APR05

A First-Time Peek from the Hill at AIDSWatch 2017

The energy of the tribe of my fellow HIV advocates at AIDSWatch 2017 echoed the heartbeat of those we have lost from the beginning of the epidemic. I was honored to walk to halls of the Capitol building and speak for those lives, my life with every congressperson and staffer I met. Our collective voices together are the rhythm of that heartbeat that will spark change and become a deafening war cry to our legislators if they don’t listen to us.

Posted By: Kamaria Laffrey, Positive Women's Network - USA, SERO Project - Wednesday, April 05, 2017


MAR15

Lessons in HIV Advocacy: A Conversation with Rod Brown

Rod Brown has been engaged in HIV since the start of the epidemic, when he lost his best friend to AIDS. Shortly thereafter, he began attending AIDSWatch, the nation’s largest HIV/AIDS advocacy event. Currently, Rod works with the Florida Department of Health, overseeing HIV testing efforts. We caught up with Rod to learn more about his work, motivations, and why HIV advocacy is still so important.

Posted By: Sarah Hashmall, Communications Manager - Wednesday, March 15, 2017


FEB21

Born to Break Barriers: A Conversation with Arianna Lint

Arianna Lint is a transgender Latina refugee from Lima, Peru. She immigrated to the US almost 20 years ago, after graduating from law school in Peru. In 2006, when she tested HIV positive, she felt that it was a punishment for her identity and she managed in silence. But after educating herself about HIV and getting involved in her community, Arianna has emerged as a leading HIV and trans rights activist. I had the opportunity to talk to Arianna about her work as an activist, starting her own organization, and how organizations can be more trans-affirming.

Posted By: Sarah Hashmall, Communications Manager - Tuesday, February 21, 2017


JAN27

Breaking Down Barriers to HIV Care

We have the tools to keep people living with HIV healthy and virally suppressed, but here in the US, fewer than half of people living with HIV are taking antiretroviral medications, with only about a third virally suppressed. Looking closer, these rates are even lower among some underserved populations, such as transgender women of color, people living in poverty, and people who are unstably housed. To change that, we set off to find strategies to counter some of our country’s most stubborn barriers to HIV care, such as lack of transportation, housing instability, poverty, HIV stigma, and more.

Posted By: AIDS United - Friday, January 27, 2017


DEC07

Holding Safe Space for LGBTQ Youth in Alabama

The Magic City Acceptance Center (MCAC), a project of Birmingham AIDS Outreach (BAO), is a supportive and affirming space for LGBTQ youth. In 2013, BAO adopted LGBTQ issues into its mission statement, and a year later, MCAC became Birmingham’s first direct-service provider to LGBTQ youth. We also offer HIV testing, education and body-positive sexual wellness workshops to help address the high HIV/STI rates for queer southern youth.

Posted By: Lauren Jacobs, Youth Outreach Coordinator and Amanda Keller, Director of LGBTQ Programs, Magic City Acceptance Center - Wednesday, December 07, 2016


NOV07

Why More is At Stake This Election Than You Think

Unless you have been living under a rock for the past year, you will likely already know that Tuesday, November 8th is Election Day across the United States. To say that this election cycle has been been hard to watch would be an understatement. The news cycle has been primarily focused on the general public’s disdain towards the candidates and the nasty attacks and harmful rhetoric that has been on display for the world to see (and hear). While having to select the next leader of the free world in these conditions may seem to be disheartening for some, we still need to participate in the political process because too much is at stake.

Posted By: Christina Adeleke, Esq.,Communications and Development Coordinator, North Carolina AIDS Action Network - Monday, November 07, 2016


AUG03

Southern REACH: Pushing the Nation Forward

Working on the Southern REACH portfolio the last five years has been inspiring. Over time I have seen the cohort become smaller but stronger! It’s been encouraging to see organizations in the South come together to build networks, move policy forward, and mobilize and engage to make real policy change. This level of mobilization and engagement has yielded real policy change and improved the lives of people living with HIV. For example, North Carolina Harm Reduction Coalition has worked tirelessly to legalize syringe exchanges in their state, and after years of hard work, their advocacy paid off big time when Governor McCrory signed a bill that legalized syringe exchange, on July 11th, 2016. In fact, North Carolina lawmakers made history by becoming the first veto-proof Republican super majority to legalize syringe exchange programs. This victory matters, it will change lives, and it is exactly what Southern REACH grantees do every day.

Posted By: Liam Cabal, Senior Program Manager, AIDS United - Wednesday, August 03, 2016



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