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OCT24

Using Telemedicine in Rural Alabama

In 2011, with the support of the AIDS United Access to Care Initiative, Medical AIDS Outreach (MAO) established the Alabama eHealth program to deliver high-quality care in underserved communities in rural portions of the state through telemedicine. Specifically targeting areas that serve as epicenters of HIV/AIDS incidence, MAO has leveraged telemedicine technology against rurality and poverty-driven barriers to accessing HIV care, ultimately empowering Alabama’s rural residents to access the quality care that they deserve in the communities where they live. I spoke with Dr. Laurie Dill, MAO’s medical director and chief medical officer, to learn more about MAO’s experience with telemedicine.

Posted By: Sarah Hashmall, Communications Manager - Tuesday, October 24, 2017


OCT04

Continuing Forward: Leadership For Now

I got a call in May 2016. “Jesse we are searching for the interim President & CEO of AIDS United…. Are you interested?” Without missing a heartbeat, I thought to myself, “You must do this – now!” My life changed immediately. I could never have predicted all the other changes coming in 2016. For all of us living with, working for, and affected by HIV in America, 2016 was a year of unexpected change.

Posted By: Jesse Milan, Jr, President & CEO, AIDS United - Wednesday, October 04, 2017


JAN27

Breaking Down Barriers to HIV Care

We have the tools to keep people living with HIV healthy and virally suppressed, but here in the US, fewer than half of people living with HIV are taking antiretroviral medications, with only about a third virally suppressed. Looking closer, these rates are even lower among some underserved populations, such as transgender women of color, people living in poverty, and people who are unstably housed. To change that, we set off to find strategies to counter some of our country’s most stubborn barriers to HIV care, such as lack of transportation, housing instability, poverty, HIV stigma, and more.

Posted By: AIDS United - Friday, January 27, 2017


DEC13

Building Community in Rural Virginia: An Interview with Kim Williams

Most people living with HIV served by the University of Virginia Ryan White Clinic live in rural communities and travel a significant distance to get to and from the clinic. In addition to the distance they must travel to receive care, most patients face additional barriers to care such as HIV stigma, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance use, intimate partner violence, or poverty. To better support their patients’ well-being and ability to stay in care, the University of Virginia created a smartphone app, Positive Links. This app supports people living with HIV by providing a virtual community, tools to help track adherence and wellness behaviors, educational resources, and more. I was privileged to be able to speak with Kim Williams, a grandmother, poet, and patient of University of Virginia Ryan White Clinic about her experiences with the Positive Links app.

Posted By: Melissa Werner, Senior Program Manager - Tuesday, December 13, 2016


OCT10

Maintaining the Balance: Lessons from Peer Evaluators

Since the earliest days of the AIDS epidemic, peers have played critical roles in providing care for people affected by HIV, advocating for policy change to improve services, and helping people at high risk for the disease to develop life-saving risk-reduction skills. In the summer of 2015, I visited all five of the RiC grantees who used peers to conduct evaluation activities and conducted 20 qualitative interviews with peers and their program managers. While our findings from this study will be shared soon in the webinar “Meaningful Involvement of Peers in Evaluation and Data Collection” and in peer-reviewed journals, here are some highlights from the interviews.

Posted By: Mary Hawk, DrPH, LSW, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health - Monday, October 10, 2016


SEP07

Helping Formerly Incarcerated People Living with HIV Stay in Care: Good for Them, Good for the Community

The time after incarceration is one of increased vulnerability and formerly incarcerated people may be particularly susceptible to drug overdose, suicide, or re-arrest. Without linkage interventions, barriers to care that existed prior to entering a correctional facility remain. A successful re-entry linkage-to-care intervention can provide the "link" between the correctional facility and community medical care, and other services, thereby maintaining or improving clinical health status, such as non-detectible viral load. When successful, these interventions can decrease HIV transmission, reduce recidivism, improve quality of life for individuals and, ultimately, for communities.

Posted By: Melissa Werner, Senior Program Manager - Wednesday, September 07, 2016


JUN28

Science Alone Can't Create a Just World

I often talk about what it was like testing HIV-positive in 1992, when the only treatment available was AZT. Today, I consider the bounty of treatments available and the many more in development. I think of what science has done for me, this field, and for so many others like me. Yet science alone can’t create a just world. In its purest form, science can be cold, calculated, and simply focused on what can be proven true or false. Science has delivered both cures and bombs, has been used for both good and bad. While science has the potential to fix much of what ails us — it won’t work for the advancement of us all without being firmly steeped in and led by our values.

Posted By: Michael Kaplan, President & CEO, AIDS United - Tuesday, June 28, 2016


DEC01

World AIDS Day 2015: Making the Promise a Reality

This World AIDS Day, help us make the promise a reality. Please consider a tax-deductible year-end gift or monthly pledge to AIDS United. By investing in our work, we can continue to advance our mission of ending the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States.

Posted By: Michael Kaplan, President & CEO, AIDS United - Tuesday, December 01, 2015


SEP08

Join AIDS United at the United States Conference on AIDS

Later this week, September 10 - 13, the 19th annual United States Conference on AIDS (USCA) will take place here in Washington, DC. The conference is the largest HIV/AIDS- related conference in the United States and will bring together activists, providers, case managers, and more.

Posted By: AIDS United - Tuesday, September 08, 2015


JUL27

Connection & Inspiration: The 2015 Access to Care Convening

In mid-June, AIDS United brought together representatives from its Access to Care and Retention in Care initiatives for the fifth and final Access to Care Convening. Representatives from partner organizations came from across the country to meet in Washington DC, to share successes and challenges, to discuss lessons learned from the ground-breaking initiatives, to hear presentations on the national evaluation documenting the positive impact of their work for people living with HIV, and to celebrate the connections and collaboration that have been fostered over the years.

Posted By: Erin Nortrup, Senior Program Manager - Access to Care, AIDS United - Monday, July 27, 2015



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